September 23, 2020

1987-03-20 – Press and Sun Bulletin

1987 03 20 Press_and_Sun_Bulletin_Fri__Mar_20__1987_

Anot er. coop’ o ownshend w

M 20,1”! Press fi'étinifinll'etin 0 Good'l‘imes 3

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By ERIC SCHAFER
Rook Reviewer

I became a Who fan again this past
week. Not that I’d ever stopped being a
Who fan, but after listening to themspracti-
cally eyery day for somethm like 1 years
fiver smce my Sister play) I Can See For

ila for me when I was I’d had enough
for awhile.

So_ for a couple of them I mined my
hearing listening to 0 er bands. The ac-
quisition this week however, of two boot-
leg LPs of earl 0 material, along with
the release of eter Townshend’s Another

Scoop, has brought me back into the fold,
so to speak.

Listening to several hours of the Who’s
early demos, outtakes, and alternate cuts,
and the second antholo of Townshend’s
home demos (the first was released
in March 1983), I was struc again by the
collective genius 'of the band and Towns-
hend’s own singular genius.

Another Scoop is not as immediately ac-

I Anothet Scoop by Peter Towns-
hend (ATCO Records)

cessible or viscerally exciting as Scoop be-
cause this material has more to do with
Townshend’s own personal vision than
with the Who. Nevertheless, it’s just as in-
teresting because it contains e riments
with orchestral music compose and con-
ducted by Pete’s father-in-law, Ted Astley;
some songs inspired b and dedicated to
Townshend’s avatar, eher Baba; and
some numbers usin a “myriad speaker
system,” in which ownshend created a
synthetic orchestra by running 3 thesizer
music through 16 se arately c annelled
speakers arranged in ormal string section

grouping.
Townshend provides historical notes on
each song, includin where and when it

was recorded and t e equipment and in-
struments used.

As a musician makes demos for private

reference only, listening to them is like
getting to read someone’s diary, and no
one has kept a more fascinating diary than
Pete Townshend. It’s intriguing, exciting
and quite often hilarious to hear how he
developed as a writer, musician, and pro-
ducer over the past 20 years.

eave you wantlng more

One thing that thankfully never
changed is his bratty voice and snotty atti-
tude :— it’s there on the 1964 cut of Call
Me Lgtming and it’s still here on the woo-
zy 19 version of You Better You Bet.

As usual wnth Pete, you get a little .of
everything here. There’s is. e msxte
acoustic guitardplayinF and sitive y evxl
vocals on the emos rom e rock opera
Tommy, Pinball Wizard and Christmas (he
was only 23 when he composed his master-

iece opera). There’s anagonized cover of
ohn Lee Hooker’s antm Blues, recorded
at a time when Townshend felt he’d lost
himself, and a beautiful, poetic balla The
Shout, tecorded “slowly through a s eep-
less mght,"_ complete with a lovely,
Springsteen-like vocal.
There aren’t as man
ems here like Scoo ’s
ular and Dirty

undiscovered
ou’re So Clever,
ater. But as Pete’s
late fat er famed clarinet and saxophone
player Clifford Blandford Townshengl (to
whom Another Scoop is dedicated), sa1d,_ “I
don’t care what you call it, as long as |th
real music, and as long as it swings.” This
stuff swings.